The Project Cargo Breakbulk Expo logo

MARCH 31 -APRIL 2021

GRB Houston

Offshore Wind Focus Sessions

OFFSHORE WIND RELATED OPPORTUNITIES FOR STEEL FABRICATORS - April 2, 2020, 9:00 - 11:00am

Many of the components, subcomponents, and infrastructure for the initial phase of commercial offshore wind projects in the U.S. will be imported due to lack of qualified U.S. manufacturing and supply capabilities. Accelerating the maturation of the U.S. supply chain benefits developers, ratepayers, and state governments seeking economic growth and stability, and will bolster the U.S. manufacturing sector. Concepts to stimulate domestic production of offshore wind system components such as substructures, blades, towers, turbine parts and assembly, cables, vessels, and a wide range of subcomponents are needed. Successful concepts should result in increased utilization of existing U.S. manufacturing, new manufacturing, alternative methods of Jones Act compliance, and new system designs that favor local content. Proposed projects are not limited to existing design configurations but may offer collaborative innovations that introduce combinations of new materials, new strategies for deployment, and new advanced manufacturing methods that leapfrog current U.S. market constraints. This session will explore the potential in this sector.

OFFSHORE WIND RELATED OPPORTUNITIES FOR US PORTS - April 2, 2020, 11:00 - 1:00pm

The Department of Energy (DOE) are looking to engage all ports and develop a detailed database of available space, berths and general capacity to support the offshore wind farm supply chain for the construction period and long-term maintenance tenants, essentially affecting the entire US Coastline. In some cases this could also include steel fabrication tenants for bases and barges, cabling related tenants and possibly long-term infrastructure such as onshore transformer sites. We unpack and expand on this exciting opportunity for ports in greater detail.

OFFSHORE WIND RELATED OPPORTUNITIES FOR SHIP BUILDERS - April 2, 2020, 3:00 - 5:00pm

Larger turbines typically require heavy lift vessels with increased capacity. Weightlifting capacity and boom height often determine vessel cost parameters, but the ability to install ever-larger turbines may be limited if the lift capacity of available vessels cannot increase accordingly. Alternative, innovative vessel solutions should be developed, which may be realized through new ship designs or the repurposing of existing U.S.-flagged vessels. Vessel alternatives must be considered alongside turbine/foundation system design to enable cost-effective assembly and installation of 12 MW+ wind turbines in the U.S., in compliance with the Jones Act, and throughout the world. Other vessels involved in offshore wind construction include cable laying, crew transfer, and service operation vessels. The availability and suitability of these vessels in the U.S. should be studied; technology solutions may be needed to support wind turbine installation, operation, and maintenance using new or existing vessels.